During my brief stint as an employment counselor, I spent all day every day talking to people about jobs. It wasn’t usually a cheerful conversation.

Not only did most of these folks arrive at the Employment Service in a state of frustration, they seldom had any idea about what kind of job they wanted. “I’ll take anything,” is the career plan of the desperate.

Like so many of us, these folks considered work a necessary evil. In this perspective, a job was the price you paid to get the money you needed to buy the stuff you wanted. And it lasted a lifetime.

This sad notion about work is still wildly prevalent. A new book, Dying for a Paycheck, explores the hazards caused by the peril facing job holders today.

What a contrast that is to this observation from Frances Mayes about her life after leaving her college teaching job and becoming a writer who shares her passion for living in Italy. In Every Day in Tuscany she writes, “I rifle through my four project boxes, dreaming of several books I will write…Work like this feels like play.

“From living in Italy and seeing how people live and love, I saw that play is something you don’t always know you’ve lost in daily life. So much energy poured into my job.

“Leftover time seemed full of a lesser reward: enjoyment. But not play, the exuberant rush of fun that comes naturally to Italians. At home, many of the activities I planned for fun seemed like summer reruns.

“Learning from another culture is one of those mysterious movements of the psyche. I think you learn what you need to unlearn.”

I think unlearning is a huge part of the joyfully jobless journey. We don’t even realize how much of our employee mindset we’re still carrying around. Unlearning was certainly on my agenda.

As Frances Mayes discovered, “Writing is play. You choose a subject and set out to learn and think as much s you can about it. Then you get to let your imagination loose in the arena.”

Sounds to me like the perfect way to build a business, too. That’s precisely what we’ll be doing in my upcoming Small, Sassy & Successful seminars

If you’d like to collaborate and bring this fun learning adventure to your part of the world, I still have time available later this year. Feel free to let me know you’re interested and we’ll explore the possibilities. Email me at barbara@joyfullyjobless.com.